Sunday, 25 April 2021

An Ocean of Violets in Bloom


The almost finished  paysho from 16th April
 This is just a quick follow-on from my previous garden-related post.  Mainly because I haven't got anything else to publish, as all I've been doing lately is rebuilding the bloody paysho.
And going to the garden centre this morni-
 Which was a waste of time as they didn't have what I wanted.  And there were far too many people!
All wearing face masks and
keeping their distance.  Mostly...
The end of today's efforts having relaid the slabs
and cemented the pond-edge
 Anyway, that's enough from the SubC, let's get on with the post.
Rude!
 As you can see from the leading photo, my early Morning Glory has put forth its second flower.  Although, despite flowering very early in the season, this bloom didn't open until this afternoon (because I had it tucked away in the depths of the red greenhouse and only remembered to pop it on the shelf in the sun at lunch time).
Hmmm...  the grass needs a cut

Things are beginning to perk up in my shady garden...

... like this little dog's tooth violet (Erythronium "White Beauty")

The violas in one of the daff pots are still going strong

This little wild violet is growing at the base of my Magnolia...

... which I finally repotted and moved into the sun last week

The elephant's ears (Bergenia something-or-other) under the bird bath are doing well

Finally, the two "New Zealand Purple" castor oil plant seedlings (Ricinus communis) have been released from their bag-propagator and are basking in the sun on the bathroom window sill

  That's about it for now except to leave you with a little music from which the title of this post is NOT taken (I find "When Doves Cry" a little too sultry and grim, so you've got "Raspberry Beret" instead).  Oh, and I can see I've got some your blogs to read - but I might just watch a film first...

26 comments:

  1. Your paysho grows, yeah !

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    1. Slowly, but yes! It might even be ready for Summer - should we get one...

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  2. HEY - i'm in ! First !

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  3. Marvellous to see how your garden s developing as you want it - next, the pond...

    Good to see the seedlings rocketing away - I'm sure, like us, the next issue will be to work out where they're all going to go! Jx

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    1. Well, it's not exactly how I want it, but it's reasonably close and not worth creating a scene about (although I have created one or two scenes).

      Yes, the seeds. I was sure that some wouldn't germinate, but every single one of the little bleeders did! Delargo Seeds are top notch, I must say. As for where they're going to go, I'm hoping friends and neighbours may take some - as long as this cold weather doesn't kill them off, of course.

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    2. So pleased that the seedlings have done well. I think the seeds being fresh makes a big difference.

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  4. What a talent. Love it. Very pretty. Can't wait to see the finished product in full bloom.

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    1. Thank you! Bits of it are very pretty, but when I look at the whole thing, I just see a bit of a scrappy mess at the mo. Still, in a couple of months, the plants should grow up and over, covering up the horrors!

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  5. Oh no! I hope nothing bad happened to your psycho that it should require rebuilding.
    Actually I have Hannibal starring the scrumptious Mads Mikkelsen waiting for me so have lost interest in everything else on the earth. Sorry.

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    1. No, nothing bad happened to it as such - the builder just didn't construct it to the exacting specifications that were given, so I had to take up the slabs and re-lay them. The whole point off getting someone else to do it was so that I wouldn't have to. I might have known.

      Oh, why am I bothering? You're clearly not taking any notice of what I'm saying... ;)

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  6. I love your yard and I'm jealous of your paysho as it comes together, but I don't envy all the work that goes into doing it.

    I "met" Prince once, if you could call passing each other on the sidewalk and saying "Hey" to each other with a head ups gesture. I was surprised at how short he was, I'm 5'8"(68ft). When I first moved to Seattle in 1998 I got a tiny studio apartment in Seattle's most eclectic neighborhood called Capitol Hill. You could pass a lot of well-known artists and musicians on the streets back then. It was home of grunge music and lots of experimental styles in fashion, music art, lit etc. It's long since been gentrified now and it breaks my heart to think of all that's been lost. Many of us misfits then moved to Fremont, but then two years later the yuppies gentrified it too. The worst offense is how they ruined my favorite Irish pub, for one thing, Who puts CARPET IN A FUCKING PUB!?!?!? I miss the days when there was a possibility you might fall through the floorboards and into the cellar on your way to the loo. The place had character. It was representative of the people. Everyone was interesting, slightly damaged and beautiful.

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    1. I'm not surprised you thought Prince was short if you're 68 feet tall! I trust you didn't step on him?

      Carpeting a pub is akin to carpeting a bathroom.

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    2. Ha,ha,ha. Oops, I didn't mean feet. *blushing in embarrassment* I am not related to the 50ft tall woman. How about inches, lets go with inches.

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  7. My cutie, it is all rather looking so elegant!!! Now come sit here... and I massage your weary back from such back breaking work**** I am adoring the violas. They are one of my early favorites. And the wild violets, my mother has them growing every where in gardens, and even in her lawn. I always feel bad when the mowers come, I weep. I had no idea you guys had magnolia's over there. It's probably my favorite flowering tree. Mother has one. We have several star magnolia trees here on the grounds of the apartment complex...there currently very glorious.

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    1. I never really liked violets/violas/pansies, but they're such a bright and beautiful flower for late Winter and Spring, that I've come around to them.
      Magnolias seem to be ten a penny over here. There's a stunning one on the main road - I'll have to get a photo for you.

      Now, about that massage. Just a little lower...

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  8. You have a thing for concentric circles and curves don't you? Anyhow, I like your paysho, or psycho, very much.
    I think you deserve tea and cake now.
    Sx

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    1. Now that you come to mention it, I rather think I do have a thing for concentric circles and curves. And spirals and helixes, too! This extra work on the psycho isn't endearing me to it, though...

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  9. Did somebody mention CAKE?

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    1. Trust Ms Scarlet! * tut *

      Coincidentally, I made a chocolate cake today for my brother-in-law and youngest niece's birthdays on Wednesday. I just hope that I manage to get a bit before they scoff the lot!

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  10. That is absolutely gorgeous. Are you holding all those plants in pots or is it supposed to be that way, because it looks super classy, even if you weren't going for that. And your blue morning glory is to swoon! From the kind of plants you've got coming into bloom, you and I live in the same growing zone (Here it's called the USDA zone; I don't know what you call it over there; Martha? Martha the growing zone?) All this AND you know how to write in Vulcan. I think I am in LUV.

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    1. Yep, all the outside plants in pots will probably stay in pots rather than be planted out in the garden. Mainly because I like having clusters of pots, or a few dotted around as it reminds me of my old Back Passage (but also because some of them are a bit tender and need bringing into the red greenhouse in winter, and also because I'm too lazy to do anything else with them!).
      I don't know if we have growing zone names/codes? It mostly seems to be "If you live in the north, bring it in, but if you live in the south, leave it out". Or something?

      I'll scrawl you a little Vulcan something next time I go down on the beach!

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    2. The RHS has a handy guide on its website - and if you open the PDF it shows the equivalent USDA ratings. Jx

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    3. Ooh, thanks, Jon!
      So, I think around here is H4-H3 (with the sea keeping us a little warmer than inland areas), so that's USDA 8b/9a-9b/10a.

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  11. Gosh Mr D you have done wonders.
    Erythroniums are very jolly and the Magnolia must be a great joy.
    Keep up the good work and keep us posted.

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    1. Thank you - I will do!

      P.S. I love that little dog's tooth violet. I planted another (a purple one) at the other end of that oblong pot, but only the white one came up. However, another one popped up in the garden that I don't remember planting, so perhaps it got moved somehow (the flower bud hasn't opened yet, so I don't know what colour it is)?
      P.P.S. And that Magnolia flower STILL hasn't opened!

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Tickle my fancy, why don't you?